Tipping in Jordan : How Much to Tip in Jordan?

Tipping in Jordan : How Much to Tip in Jordan?

Tipping in Jordan

 
How Much to Tip in Jordan? 
Tipping Guidelines and Baksheesh Etiquette.
 
Gratuities
Many Travelers view tipping as a difficult subject, though this need not be the case.  The first thing to remember is that tipping is not compulsory, nor are there any fixed amounts.  The bottom line in determining whether and how much to tip is to ask yourself how much the individual did to make your travels more enjoyable.  It is with this in mind that we offer the following information.  
​Tips of 10% are generally expected in better restaurants.  Elsewhere, rounding up the bill to the nearest 250 fils or with loose change is appreciated by underpaid staff, including taxi drivers.  Hotels and restaurants in the midrange and, especially, top-end categories generally add on an automatic 10% service charge, although whether this actually returns to the staff who served you is another question.

Gratuities for guides and drivers are not included in the price of your tour so we offer the following tipping guidelines.
Recommended tipping schedule for groups:
Guide: $5 per person per day
Driver: $3 per person per day
Hotels: $2 per person per day
Restaurants: $1 per person per restaurant.
Recommended tipping schedule for small groups or Individual Travellers:
Guide: $10-$20 per person per day.
Driver: $10-$20 per person per day.
 
Tipping in Jordan is a part of the culture and in most cases leaving a tip is good etiquette, unless of course the service was terrible. Many industries, such as restaurants, pay lower wages to the employees with the expectation that they will receive tips. Therefore, it's important that you give generously when you get amazing service. A tip of 10% is standard in almost all circumstances. If you find a charge has already been added to your bill (which is common), consider giving the worker a small tip anyway, since they will likely not receive that percentage.
 
Gratuities
Many Travelers view tipping as a difficult subject, though this need not be the case.  The first thing to remember is that tipping is not compulsory, nor are there any fixed amounts.  The bottom line in determining whether and how much to tip is to ask yourself how much the individual did to make your travels more enjoyable.  It is with this in mind that we offer the following information.  
​Tips of 10% are generally expected in better restaurants.  Elsewhere, rounding up the bill to the nearest 250 fils or with loose change is appreciated by underpaid staff, including taxi drivers.  Hotels and restaurants in the midrange and, especially, top-end categories generally add on an automatic 10% service charge, although whether this actually returns to the staff who served you is another question.

Gratuities for guides and drivers are not included in the price of your tour so we offer the following tipping guidelines.
Recommended tipping schedule for small groups or Individual Travellers ( 1 - 7 persons ):
- Local Guides in Sites :
( i.e : Petra , Wadi Rum , Jerash : $ 20 - $ 30 For all per guide (NOT Per person)
-Driver(s) : 
$10-$20 For all (NOT Per person) per driver per day 
 
Recommended tipping schedule for groups more than 08 persons :
Guide: $5 per person per day
Driver: $3 per person per day
Hotels Bell Boy: $2 per person per day
Restaurants: $1 per person per restaurant.
 
 

 

 
Tipping in Hotels
Hotels from the midrange to top-end categories generally add on a service charge of 10%.
For bellboys and porters, JD 1-2, or US$ 2 is customary to give.
If you stay at a hotel more than one night it's good idea to give a few dinars or dollars in advance to the room service personnel and the cleaners.
They will pay extra attention and surprise you with swans and other creations they fold from your towels. 
Tipping in Restaurants
10% for service may be automatically added to the bill, but a small tip - 5-10% - for the waiters is appropriate. 
 
 
Tour Guides
Again, in case of a group package tour, let your travel agent advise you. The amount of tip can depend on the size of the group, duration of the trip, etc.
If you hire a private guide for yourself - for all Jordan or in wadi Rum - you should agree on a total price for his services. Only pay extra if you feel you received great service.
In touristic sites like Petra or Jerash you can hire an official guide from the Visitor Center and I recommend to give them some extra tip, depending on your satisfaction. 
Some of the guides are very knowledgeable, have a degree in history or archaeology.
On the other hand there have been some complaints reported about guides in Petra who refused to continue the guiding beyond the Treasury unless paid extra. Always keep your receipt of the fare you paid at the Visitor Center and complain to the Tourist Police if you feel you didn't get the service you paid for. 
 
Others
Everyday people in Jordan do not expect baksheesh for simple things like giving you directions, most of them would refuse to take anything if you offered. However, it is nice to give some small change for kids when they do a favour for you.
If you hitch hike, you are expected to pay the driver roughly the same amount you would pay for the public bus.
Snorkeling guides: when you hire snorkel gears on South Beach you can usually ask someone to show you the best spots on the coral reefs. Depending on the duration of the guiding and, again, your satisfaction, you can pay him JD5-10.
For any other services like glass bottom boat, short camel and horse rides, horse cart etc. you pay the price they charge so I don't see a reason for extra tipping, but of course you are free to give them some extra if you are happy with their services.